Under The Neem Tree (English) View larger

Under The Neem Tree (English)

Author : P Anuradha
Illustrator : A V Ilango

Who should get more rottis — Ookamma or Ookaiah? The coming together of two stories, one real and one folk, gives the telling a tender yet amusing twist. Well known artist A.V. Ilango's strong, flowing lines recreate the earthy ambience of rural Andhra.

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Rs. 150.00

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Age 6+
Specifications 24 pages; 10.5” x 8.5”; full colour; soft cover
Translator Manohar Reddy
ISBN 978-93-5046-060-3

This story written originally in Telugu by a Dalit writer and teacher, is part of a collection of stories of the Dalit experience called 'Different Tales' collated by Anveshi Women's Research Centre, Hyderabad. Worked around a well-known folktale about a couple who quarrel about who shall eat more rottis, the story is seamlessly woven into another story about the real lives of children in a small Andhra village, growing up playing, going to a typical government school, watching adults squabble, feeling hunger and understanding friendship and, most importantly, sitting under a neem tree and listening to stories from an old grandmother. The coming together of the two stories, one real and one folk gives the telling a tender yet amusing twist.

An interesting read

The story, at its basic level, is about a group of children listening to a folktale narrated in installments by the village story-teller Nainamma. She narrates the well known story of Ookamma and Ookaiah. However there are additional complications. The issue of equality of the sexes and equal importance of their work and roles in society comes up. Goodbooks.in

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Under The Neem Tree (English)

Under The Neem Tree (English)

Who should get more rottis — Ookamma or Ookaiah? The coming together of two stories, one real and one folk, gives the telling a tender yet amusing twist. Well known artist A.V. Ilango's strong, flowing lines recreate the earthy ambience of rural Andhra.

Write a review